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What To Plant Where

Posted by Local Llano on March 31, 2017

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What to Plant Where

With winter waning and spring just around the corner, there’s no better time than now for planning your spring garden. And don’t forget to give serious consideration to companion gardening during your planning.

Companion gardening is based on the fact that some plants grow well next to others. Like humans, you could say they get along better with some than with others.

Companion Gardening: A Closer Look

Companion gardening entails the establishment of two or more plant species in close proximation of each other. While the mechanisms of plant interaction aren’t always understood, companion gardening is a proven method that allows vegetables and herbs grow to their maximum potential.

Companion gardening is used for pest control, pollination, and providing a beneficial habitat for gardening and agriculture. The origins of companion gardening certainly aren’t new as they can be traced back thousands of years ago to ancient Mesoamerica.

March Planting: Companion Gardening Style

March is a great month to get your garden ready. You’ll want to plant during a window of opportunity that’s between the late-winter chill and the blazing hot weather that’s often common to West Texas summers.

Choose a sunny spot, because most vegetables prefer full sun exposure. Direct sunlight is usually a must if you want to grow a productive garden. Spring is also a great time to get rid of any weeds in your garden before they reach full growth.

Let’s take a closer look at some vegetables that are ideal for March planting and what plants are their perfect “companions.”

*Beets

Planting beets now will provide an early summer treat. You should plant them by broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, and chard, but away from pole beans, field mustard, and charlock.

*Broccoli

Broccoli (as well as brussels sprouts) should be planted by beets, carrots and onions, and herbs such as sage, thyme, and dill. Don’t plant them by strawberries.

*Cabbage and Cauliflower

Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in a garden. Along with cauliflower, cabbage grows best near broccoli, brussels sprouts, celery, spinach, chard, and tomatoes. Keep both cabbage and cauliflower away from strawberries.

*Carrots

Plant carrots close to cabbage, lettuce, chives, peas, radishes, and early potatoes, as well as near herbs such as rosemary, sage, and wormwood.

*Corn

Corn is fast-growing and great to eat (and tastes best when cooked right after being pulled from the stalk). Beans, cucumbers, early potatoes, melons, peas, pumpkins, soybeans and squash are suitable neighbors for corn.

*Cucumbers

Cucumbers will produce in large numbers and provide plenty of food for your table. Plant them by beans, corn, early potatoes, radishes, cabbage and sunflowers, but away from late potatoes.

*Lettuce

Plant lettuce close to beets, carrots, parsnips, radishes, and strawberries, but not near cabbage.

*Onions

Be careful to select an onion that’s suitable for your region’s weather. In warmer climates, short-day onions are most suitable. Plant your onions near beets, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, and parsnips while keeping them away from beans and peas.

*Peppers

Peppers take up little space and produce high yields. Plant peppers near carrots, onions, eggplant, parsley, and tomatoes, but not near fennel and kohlrabi.

*Spinach

Spinach is considered more of a cool weather vegetable and will produce until the hot weather settles in. Spinach should be planted near celery, cauliflower, eggplant, and strawberries.

*Tomatoes

The tomato is the most popular garden vegetable and used in a variety of dishes and recipes. Plant your tomatoes near asparagus, cabbage, carrots, parsley, onions, rosemary, sage, and mustard, while keeping them away from fennel, kohlrabi, and walnuts.

Sources

http://www.texasgardener.com/pastissues/janfeb03/10secrets.html

http://www.ufseeds.com/What-To-Plant-Now.html#March

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/companion-planting-guide-zmaz81mjzraw?pageid=2#PageContent2

http://farmersalmanac.com/home-garden/2010/05/10/what-is-companion-planting/


What to Plant Where

With winter waning and spring just around the corner, there’s no better time than now for planning your spring garden. And don’t forget to give serious consideration to companion gardening during your planning.

Companion gardening is based on the fact that some plants grow well next to others. Like humans, you could say they get along better with some than with others.

Companion Gardening: A Closer Look

Companion gardening entails the establishment of two or more plant species in close proximation of each other. While the mechanisms of plant interaction aren’t always understood, companion gardening is a proven method that allows vegetables and herbs grow to their maximum potential.

Companion gardening is used for pest control, pollination, and providing a beneficial habitat for gardening and agriculture. The origins of companion gardening certainly aren’t new as they can be traced back thousands of years ago to ancient Mesoamerica.

March Planting: Companion Gardening Style

March is a great month to get your garden ready. You’ll want to plant during a window of opportunity that’s between the late-winter chill and the blazing hot weather that’s often common to West Texas summers.

Choose a sunny spot, because most vegetables prefer full sun exposure. Direct sunlight is usually a must if you want to grow a productive garden. Spring is also a great time to get rid of any weeds in your garden before they reach full growth.

Let’s take a closer look at some vegetables that are ideal for March planting and what plants are their perfect “companions.”

*Beets

Planting beets now will provide an early summer treat. You should plant them by broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, and chard, but away from pole beans, field mustard, and charlock.

*Broccoli

Broccoli (as well as brussels sprouts) should be planted by beets, carrots and onions, and herbs such as sage, thyme, and dill. Don’t plant them by strawberries.

*Cabbage and Cauliflower

Cabbage is one of the easier plants to grow in a garden. Along with cauliflower, cabbage grows best near broccoli, brussels sprouts, celery, spinach, chard, and tomatoes. Keep both cabbage and cauliflower away from strawberries.

*Carrots

Plant carrots close to cabbage, lettuce, chives, peas, radishes, and early potatoes, as well as near herbs such as rosemary, sage, and wormwood.

*Corn

Corn is fast-growing and great to eat (and tastes best when cooked right after being pulled from the stalk). Beans, cucumbers, early potatoes, melons, peas, pumpkins, soybeans and squash are suitable neighbors for corn.

*Cucumbers

Cucumbers will produce in large numbers and provide plenty of food for your table. Plant them by beans, corn, early potatoes, radishes, cabbage and sunflowers, but away from late potatoes.

*Lettuce

Plant lettuce close to beets, carrots, parsnips, radishes, and strawberries, but not near cabbage.

*Onions

Be careful to select an onion that’s suitable for your region’s weather. In warmer climates, short-day onions are most suitable. Plant your onions near beets, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, and parsnips while keeping them away from beans and peas.

*Peppers

Peppers take up little space and produce high yields. Plant peppers near carrots, onions, eggplant, parsley, and tomatoes, but not near fennel and kohlrabi.

*Spinach

Spinach is considered more of a cool weather vegetable and will produce until the hot weather settles in. Spinach should be planted near celery, cauliflower, eggplant, and strawberries.

*Tomatoes

The tomato is the most popular garden vegetable and used in a variety of dishes and recipes. Plant your tomatoes near asparagus, cabbage, carrots, parsley, onions, rosemary, sage, and mustard, while keeping them away from fennel, kohlrabi, and walnuts.

Sources

http://www.texasgardener.com/pastissues/janfeb03/10secrets.html

http://www.ufseeds.com/What-To-Plant-Now.html#March

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/companion-planting-guide-zmaz81mjzraw?pageid=2#PageContent2

http://farmersalmanac.com/home-garden/2010/05/10/what-is-companion-planting/

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